Utilities Don’t Have the Incentive to Promote Solar. That’s Changing.

Why isn’t there more community solar in the US? Because utilities need to disrupt their business models to incorporate more solar and right now they don’t have the incentive to do that. In the past two blogs in this series, we’ve discussed how the electricity grid works and why the grid needs to evolve. In this article, we’re going to explore how some states are incentivizing utilities to adopt more solar power and encourage ratepayers to reduce consumption.
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3 Ways the Traditional Electric Grid Can Adapt to the Solar Revolution

Given that solar has experienced an average annual growth rate of 68% in the last decade, there’s no doubt that solar power is challenging the traditional electric grid. Why? Because in many ways our electric grid is largely the same as the one envisioned and implemented by Nikola Tesla, Thomas Edison and George Westinghouse over a hundred years ago.
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What Do We Mean When We Talk About “The Grid”?

The American electricity grid is one of the greatest engineering accomplishments of the 20th century. In 1882, Thomas Edison’s Illuminating Company created the first central commercial generator in lower Manhattan, delivering electricity to local businesses, including The New York Times. By the 1920s, most cities and towns had access to electricity, immensely improving quality of life, but rural areas were still in the dark. With Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Rural Electrification Administration, the 1930s saw the electricity grid expand to America’s countryside, changing the lives of millions.
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Solar Offers a Bright Future for American Workers

Solar Offers a Bright Future for American Workers

Despite political promises, coal jobs are not coming back. Why? Because coal is significantly more expensive than natural gas and renewable energy, like wind and solar. In fact, solar is booming in America. GTM Research and the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA) predict that America’s solar market will almost triple in size in the next five years. The main reason is cost. In 2008, the wholesale price of a solar panel was $4 per watt, but by 2016 it had fallen to $0.65 per watt. Today, there are 1.4 million solar arrays in the U.S. And, for every solar array installed, a team of solar workers is needed for the job.
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Community Solar is Helping Build the Just Energy System We Need

Community Solar is Helping Build the Just Energy System We Need

Why do we need to talk about social justice when we talk about how our energy is produced? In short: pollution and economic inequality. The bad news is that the Trump Administration plans to close the Office of Environmental Justice, which for more than 20 years has been working to address these issues. But there’s hope. New ways of getting even more clean, solar power built are taking hold. In this article we’ll explore why we need a just energy system and how community solar offers an exciting new way for households to get involved, helping accelerate the transition to a renewable energy grid and displacing the energy from dirty fossil fuel plants.
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Can solar save the bees and reclaim polluted land?

Can solar save the bees and reclaim polluted land?

In 2010, Colorado was one of the first states to pass legislation to encourage shared renewable energy projects. In developing this new, more accessible renewable energy model, Colorado’s leadership set the standard for other states. Today, there are 25 states with at least one community solar project in queue. Furthermore, more than twelve states and D.C. have promoted community solar through policies, legislation and incentives. In the next five years, community solar will contribute 1.6 gigawatts to the grid (as of 2014, community solar accounted for just 66 megawatts of additional power). By 2020, community solar will more than double solar capacity in the U.S. Along with this tremendous growth, some solar developers are finding new environmental benefits from community solar gardens by recovering polluted lands and making new homes for pollinator-friendly wildflowers.
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Community Choice Aggregation: A Tool for Achieving our Renewable Energy Goals

After several years of discussion, the New York State Public Service Commission (PSC) recently announced that it would give large cities across the state an easier path toward implementing power purchasing agreements through its Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) program. Although that may sounds like a lot of acronyms and a small adjustment, this change could play a large role in moving New York State toward its renewable energy goals.

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Top 3 Reasons Community Solar is a Really Big Deal

New Yorkers are on the brink of a major new renewable energy opportunity. It’s called “community solar” — and it’s a really big deal.

In a nutshell, community solar allows people to buy solar power for their homes or offices from a nearby community solar “farm” – an array of high-efficiency solar panels that could be built in a local brownfield site, on top of public buildings, or private land.  It works just like having a solar panel on your roof…but without having to install any equipment (or needing a roof!). And it’s integrated with local utilities, so you can see your solar credits right on your electricity bills.

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Raise Your Hands for Solar

If you still don’t have solar, it’s time to get off the sidelines of the solar wave and reserve your place at the front of the line of the clean energy revolution. Anybody who pays an electric bill can join. You don’t need any equipment. There are no upfront payments. And you’re likely to even save money. Rooftop solar is great, but it only works for a small group of homeowners or businesses. Community solar is here in New York. Solar for everybody is no longer an empty slogan.

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Everything You Need to Know about Community Solar in New York

Now Everyone Can Enjoy the Benefits of Solar Power

For the very first time, anyone who pays an electric bill in New York can participate in the solar power boom. In mid-2015 the state established a new initiative: the Community Distributed Generation program, which opens up the solar market to more consumers than ever before.
How? Through “Community Solar.” If you haven’t heard of it yet, you will soon – because it’s starting to pick up momentum across the state.

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